The Primrose Meditation Garden is now officially part of the international organization: The Quiet Garden Movement. http://quietgarden.org/

“The primary vision of The Quiet Garden Trust is to initiate and resource a network of local opportunities for prayer, silence, reflection and the appreciation of beauty; for learning about Christian life and spirituality; for experiencing creativity and healing in the context of God’s love.” It is the hope and prayer of Primrose United Church that the Primrose Meditation Garden will be well used as a place of beauty and quiet, a loving contribution to this world wide movement. We are deeply grateful to all those who have put the Trust in place and delighted to be part of this ongoing Christian enterprise to provide prayer space to all people of all faiths and inclinations - so exciting for our little church and garden to be part of this amazing international movement.

Have a peek: http://quietgarden.org/gardens/primrose-meditation-garden/

Rev. Candice Bist

mad joy in stillness

You must be still and silent to hear and see the rich life that is Eden.

The open field, so seemingly tame, is a mad joy dance of life.

Unlikely partners reel themselves into exhaustion,

tender green shoots waltz pleasantly with decaying elders,

and silken-petaled lupines brush up against the rough bearded thistles,

the flouncing skirts of debutant poppies

sway to the music waiting their turn.

Go then, and sit in the meadow if you dare,

cast aside your self importance,

and rest your limbs in the fragrant grass.

Still yourself and let the garden of grace be your mistress.

She will whisper such wonders,
if you can but be quiet enough to hear.
— Candice Bist

contemplative sound Blessings and Body Prayer of the Lord's Prayer,

courtesy of Philip Roderick from the Quiet Garden Movement

The situation of the soul in contemplation
is something like the situation of Adam
and Eve in Paradise. Everything is yours,
but on one infinitely important condition:
that it is all given.
— Thomas Merton, ‘Seeds of Contemplation’